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Anthidium manicatum Eventbrite

The recording of the themed Zoom Session held on Thursday 17 March at 7.30pm when Andy Millard, YNU aculeate recorder and Chair of the Executive gave a presentation on ‘Big-lipped’ Yorkshire Bees’ is now available for streaming (apologies for the typo in the title of the recording!):

Passcode: %gtykFi7
 

The recording of the themed Zoom session held on Thursday 17 February at 7.30pm when Dr Dave Wainwright, Senior Conservation Manager (Northern England) for Butterfly Conservation gave a presentation on Conserving Lepidoptera of the North Yorkshire Moors, is now available for streaming:

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/wdqCzLV_N9qWqbozeszjFJkadox_qo3_Mg1Zv6zfJUO9aAxzEPuOVM4jUuwm_ms.m-vC7_7HzklSzbRR

Pass code: 8Xjat4=p

 

Our next themed Zoom Session will take place on Thursday 17 February at 7.30pm when Dr Dave Wainwright, Senior Conservation Manager (Northern England) for Butterfly Conservation will give a presentation on Conserving Lepidoptera of the North Yorkshire Moors. Booking through Eventbrite is now available via this link:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/conserving-lepidoptera-of-the-north-york-moors-tickets-260065602217

Friday 4 Feb 7.30pm:

Join members of the YNU and Natural History societies in a discussion via Zoom

More details here

Conservation and Natural History in Yorkshire

The then Yorkshire Naturalists’ Trust was founded in 1946 and is now renamed the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust YWT. Many of the founders were well-known naturalists, people such as Clifford Smith, Douglas Hincks, Wentworth Ping and EW Taylor.   Others such as Joan Duncan and Joyce Payne were also very active YNT members. Is that still true today? Or are the naturalist and conservationist communities travelling somewhat parallel paths?   In truth, we are a single community with a common interest, in ensuring that the nature of Yorkshire is as rich as possible.

Conservation depends on naturalists to discover what is where. I have been surprised to discover how patchy is the information that YWT holds on its reserves. Some are very well documented (Spurn, Potteric, Brockadale, Askham etc), but others seem to be little studied. There also seem not to be well-established channels to ensure that records flow to (and from) YWT. Without those records, management of reserves may be ill-founded, undermining plans to ensure that Yorkshire becomes nature-rich.

I want to explore ways in which YNU members can help to ensure that the natural history of YWT (and other) nature reserves in Yorkshire is better understood. I think that will bring obvious mutual benefits – some pastures new for the recorders and some valuable information for conservation.