News

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Waders were top of the wildlife show in North and East Yorkshire during July. One wetland in the Spurn area recorded no fewer than 28 species during the month! Several rare American waders were spotted and all three world species of Golden Plover were seen in East Yorkshire in a 48 hour period.  It wasn’t only birds migrating; dragonflies were having a good month with rare continental species seen on the coast; Lesser Emperor being the pick of the bunch. It’s great to have several underwater marine species represented in our article this month, and they are arguably the most beautiful species in our gallery. 

This monthly article written by Richard Baines (Yorkshire Coast Nature Wildlife Guide) is a detailed summary of scarce and rare wildlife seen by anyone in the area, an opportunity to pick out patterns of emergence or migration and a small gallery of some of the best photos from the month. If you have any unusual sightings please e-mail them for inclusion to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  Click here to read the full article and see more photos. 

Photos clockwise from top left: Lilac beauty by Allan Rodda, Spiny squat lobster by Mark Pearson and White-rumped sandpiper by Nigel Genn

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Article provided by Mark Wills, Senior Ecological Information Officer, NEYEDC.

In April 2017, North & East Yorkshire Ecological Data Centre (NEYEDC) held a recorders’ forum in York.  Attendance was good with a number of YNU members present and a variety of taxonomic interests represented.  Several interesting discussions took place, including the transfer of the national online species data portal from the NBN Gateway to the new NBN Atlas.

Two key elements of this change are the removal of access controls, which previously enabled enhanced access to datasets to be granted upon request, and the adoption of a set of Creative Commons licenses to replace the old NBN terms of data use.  Three licenses are available: 

  • CC0 – fully open with no limitations on use of the data
  • CC-BY – no limitations on the use of data but the data must be attributed to its source
  • CC-BY-NC – use of the data is limited to non-commercial use and data must be attributed to its source 

Further information on data licenses can be found at www.nbnatlas.org/help/data-licenses.

We will shortly begin uploading the majority of the species records held on our databases to the NBN Atlas. Datasets will be uploaded individually or in groups over a period of months to allow quality assurance processes to be undertaken and the best possible metadata to be supplied.   It is our intention to use the NBN Atlas to make data more widely available, specifically to regional and national projects, to statutory agency staff and for academic and personal studies.  NEYEDC intend to upload the majority of records at 10km resolution, under the CC-BY-NC data license in the first instance.  This will mean that data uploaded to the NBN Atlas by NEYEDC will be available at the same resolution and permissions of use as was the case for the majority of data that we place on NBN Gateway data. Some data may be uploaded at higher resolutions in the future following discussions with the originators of the data.

Sensitive data such as badger setts or raptor nests will be dealt with separately and where existing agreements are in place limiting how NEYEDC can use data made available by a recorder or society, these will continue to be honoured. If this is not possible we will exclude data from that source rather than provide a level of access via the NBN Atlas which is unacceptable to the originator of the data.

We want to give every opportunity for recorders to express any concerns they may have with our making their data available in this way. Any readers of this notice with interests in, or who may be originators of biological records that they know to be held by NEYEDC and who would like to comment, please respond to Mark Wills or Clare Langrick at NEYEDC by 30th November 2017.  We can be contacted by e-mail on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or on 01904 641631

After this date it will be assumed by NEYEDC that data providers have no objection to their records being used in this manner.

(19th July 2017)

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The Wild Watch project have organised a fantastic programme of free events to discover the wildlife of Nidderdale Outstanding Area of Natural Beauty.  Throughout July and September there is a range of walks, talks, training events and family fun sessions, including moth trapping, pond dipping, bird watching and bat detecting!  All events are free but some do need to be booked in advance. For details, click here to download the full programme.

The Wild Watch is a three year project delivered by Nidderdale AONB, an affiliated society of the YNU, with funding from The Heritage Lottery Fund. The project is helping local people to gather information on over 50 species across the AONB to provide data which will help inform conservation management of this spectacular site in the future.  For information on the project and how you can get involved, visit The Wild Watch website.

(3rd July 2017)

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Settled warm weather for most of the month brought a fabulous range of wildlife sightings to our region. It was early emergence for many uncommon insects and lots of scarce species were also recorded. Dark-bordered Beauty numbers were up and White-letter Hairstreaks were found five weeks earlier than in 2016. A pod of White-beaked Dolphins graced the coast later in the month and seabirds roared into action headlined by the returning Albatross at Bempton, found on the worst day of weather all month! In this notable final week unusual arrivals weren’t restricted to the coast as a Sabines Gull arrived at Nosterfield.   

This monthly article written by Richard Baines (Yorkshire Coast Nature Wildlife Guide) is a detailed summary of scarce and rare wildlife seen by anyone in the area, an opportunity to pick out patterns of emergence or migration and a small gallery of some of the best photos from the month. If you have any unusual sightings please e-mail them for inclusion to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  Click here to read the full article and see more photos. 

Photographs: Beautiful snout by Allan Rodda (top left), Honey Buzzard by Adrienne Lucas (top right) and Red-veined darter by Mark Pearson

(3rd July 2017)

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A mainly dry and increasingly warm month brought many naturalists and birders out into the field leading to some great sightings. The good weather suited many emerging butterflies from Duke of Burgundy to Brown Argus. Sighting of the month was much bigger, an impressive Black-browed Albatross at Bempton. At the other end of the scale, but just as impressive if you're keen on crazy moths, was the Chocolate Tip - a new moth species for Spurn. Spurn was again centre of attention for the most impressive rare bird migration moment when four Red-footed Falcons flew past at the end of the month.  

This monthly article written by Richard Baines (Yorkshire Coast Nature Wildlife Guide) is a detailed summary of scarce and rare wildlife seen by anyone in the area, an opportunity to pick out patterns of emergence or migration and a small gallery of some of the best photos from the month. If you have any unusual sightings please e-mail them for inclusion to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   Follow this link for the full article and more photographs.

Photographs clockwise from top left: Hawfinch by Jonnie Fisk, Black-browed Albatross by Joe Fryer, Siberian Stonechat by Andy Hood and Purple Barred by Nicky Wearmouth.

(6th June 2017)